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Human Splicing Finder: an online bioinformatics tool to predict splicing signals.

Nucleic acids research | May 22, 2009

Thousands of mutations are identified yearly. Although many directly affect protein expression, an increasing proportion of mutations is now believed to influence mRNA splicing. They mostly affect existing splice sites, but synonymous, non-synonymous or nonsense mutations can also create or disrupt splice sites or auxiliary cis-splicing sequences. To facilitate the analysis of the different mutations, we designed Human Splicing Finder (HSF), a tool to predict the effects of mutations on splicing signals or to identify splicing motifs in any human sequence. It contains all available matrices for auxiliary sequence prediction as well as new ones for binding sites of the 9G8 and Tra2-beta Serine-Arginine proteins and the hnRNP A1 ribonucleoprotein. We also developed new Position Weight Matrices to assess the strength of 5' and 3' splice sites and branch points. We evaluated HSF efficiency using a set of 83 intronic and 35 exonic mutations known to result in splicing defects. We showed that the mutation effect was correctly predicted in almost all cases. HSF could thus represent a valuable resource for research, diagnostic and therapeutic (e.g. therapeutic exon skipping) purposes as well as for global studies, such as the GEN2PHEN European Project or the Human Variome Project.

Pubmed ID: 19339519 RIS Download

Mesh terms: Computational Biology | Databases, Nucleic Acid | Enhancer Elements, Genetic | Humans | Internet | Mutation | RNA Splice Sites | Sequence Analysis, RNA | Silencer Elements, Transcriptional | Software | User-Computer Interface

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Ensembl

A collection of genome databases for vertebrates and other eukaryotic species with DNA and protein sequence search capabilities. The goal of Ensembl is to automatically annotate the genome, integrate this annotation with other available biological data and make the data publicly available via the web. The range of available data has also expanded to include comparative genomics, variation and regulatory data. Ensembl allows users to: upload and analyze data and save it to an Ensembl account; search for a DNA or protein sequence using BLAST or BLAT; fetch desired data from the public database, using the Perl API; download the databases via FTP in FASTA, MySQL and other formats; and mine Ensembl with BioMart and export sequences or tables in text, HTML, or Excel format. The DNA sequences and assemblies used in the Ensembl genebuild are provided by various projects around the world. Ensembl has entered into an agreement with UCSC and NCBI with regard to sequence identifiers in order to improve consistency between the data provided by different genome browsers. The site also links to the Ensembl blog with updates on new species and sequences as they are added to the database.

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Genotype-to-Phenotype Databases: A Holistic Solution

The Genotype-to-Phenotype Databases (GEN2PHEN) consortium aims to create a web-based platform to capture and unify genetic information associated with health and disease progression. The focus of the consortium is to create an integrated genetic variation catalogue for the research community, with a focus on disorders such as diabetes, obesity, heart disease and cancer.

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