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VectorBase: a data resource for invertebrate vector genomics.

Nucleic acids research | Jan 16, 2009

VectorBase (http://www.vectorbase.org) is an NIAID-funded Bioinformatic Resource Center focused on invertebrate vectors of human pathogens. VectorBase annotates and curates vector genomes providing a web accessible integrated resource for the research community. Currently, VectorBase contains genome information for three mosquito species: Aedes aegypti, Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus, a body louse Pediculus humanus and a tick species Ixodes scapularis. Since our last report VectorBase has initiated a community annotation system, a microarray and gene expression repository and controlled vocabularies for anatomy and insecticide resistance. We have continued to develop both the software infrastructure and tools for interrogating the stored data.

Pubmed ID: 19028744 RIS Download

Mesh terms: Aedes | Animals | Anopheles gambiae | Arthropod Vectors | Culex | Culicidae | Databases, Genetic | Gene Expression Profiling | Genome, Insect | Genomics | Ixodes | Pediculus | Vocabulary, Controlled

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This is a list of tools and resources that we have found mentioned in this publication.


Ensembl

A collection of genome databases for vertebrates and other eukaryotic species with DNA and protein sequence search capabilities. The goal of Ensembl is to automatically annotate the genome, integrate this annotation with other available biological data and make the data publicly available via the web. The range of available data has also expanded to include comparative genomics, variation and regulatory data. Ensembl allows users to: upload and analyze data and save it to an Ensembl account; search for a DNA or protein sequence using BLAST or BLAT; fetch desired data from the public database, using the Perl API; download the databases via FTP in FASTA, MySQL and other formats; and mine Ensembl with BioMart and export sequences or tables in text, HTML, or Excel format. The DNA sequences and assemblies used in the Ensembl genebuild are provided by various projects around the world. Ensembl has entered into an agreement with UCSC and NCBI with regard to sequence identifiers in order to improve consistency between the data provided by different genome browsers. The site also links to the Ensembl blog with updates on new species and sequences as they are added to the database.

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RefSeq

Database that provides a comprehensive, integrated, non-redundant, well-annotated set of sequences, including genomic DNA, transcripts, and proteins. It provides a stable reference for genome annotation, gene identification and characterization, mutation and polymorphism analysis (especially RefSeqGene records), expression studies, and comparative analyses. Included are sequences from plasmids, organelles, viruses, archaea, bacteria, and eukaryotes. Each RefSeq is constructed wholly from sequence data submitted to the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC). It is a unique resource because it provides a large, multi-species, curated sequence database representing separate but explicitly linked records from genomes to transcripts and translation products, as appropriate. Unlike the sequence redundancy found in the public sequence repositories that comprise the INSDC, (i.e., NCBI's GenBank, the European Nucleotide Archive, and the DNA Data Bank of Japan), the RefSeq collection aims to provide, for each included species, a complete set of non-redundant, extensively cross-linked, and richly annotated nucleic acid and protein records. It is recognized, however, that the coverage and finishing of public sequence data varies from organism to organism so intermediate genomic records are provided in some circumstances. The RefSeq collection is available without restriction and can be retrieved in several different ways, such as by searching or by available links in NCBI resources, including PubMed, Nucleotide, Protein, Gene, and Map Viewer, searching with a sequence via BLAST, and downloading from the RefSeq FTP site.

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BASE

A comprehensive management application for information, data, and analysis of microarray experiments, available as free open source software.

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