• Register
X
Forgot Password

If you have forgotten your password you can enter your email here and get a temporary password sent to your email.

X

Leaving Community

Are you sure you want to leave this community? Leaving the community will revoke any permissions you have been granted in this community.

No
Yes

Individual differences in stressor-evoked blood pressure reactivity vary with activation, volume, and functional connectivity of the amygdala.

Individuals who exhibit exaggerated blood pressure reactions to psychological stressors are at risk for hypertension, ventricular hypertrophy, and premature atherosclerosis; however, the neural systems mediating exaggerated blood pressure reactivity and associated cardiovascular risk in humans remain poorly defined. Animal models indicate that the amygdala orchestrates stressor-evoked blood pressure reactions via reciprocal signaling with corticolimbic and brainstem cardiovascular-regulatory circuits. Based on these models, we used a multimodal neuroimaging approach to determine whether human individual differences in stressor-evoked blood pressure reactivity vary with amygdala activation, gray matter volume, and functional connectivity with corticolimbic and brainstem areas implicated in stressor processing and cardiovascular regulation. We monitored mean arterial pressure (MAP) and concurrent functional magnetic resonance imaging BOLD signal changes in healthy young individuals while they completed a Stroop color-word stressor task, validated previously in epidemiological studies of cardiovascular risk. Individuals exhibiting greater stressor-evoked MAP reactivity showed (1) greater amygdala activation, (2) lower amygdala gray matter volume, and (3) stronger positive functional connectivity between the amygdala and perigenual anterior cingulate cortex and brainstem pons. Individual differences in amygdala activation, gray matter volume, and functional connectivity with corticolimbic and brainstem circuits may partly underpin cardiovascular disease risk by impacting stressor-evoked blood pressure reactivity.

Pubmed ID: 18216206

Authors

  • Gianaros PJ
  • Sheu LK
  • Matthews KA
  • Jennings JR
  • Manuck SB
  • Hariri AR

Journal

The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience

Publication Data

January 23, 2008

Associated Grants

  • Agency: NHLBI NIH HHS, Id: HL 076852/076858
  • Agency: NIMH NIH HHS, Id: K01 MH070616
  • Agency: NIMH NIH HHS, Id: K01 MH070616
  • Agency: NIMH NIH HHS, Id: K01 MH070616-04
  • Agency: NIMH NIH HHS, Id: K01 MH070616-05
  • Agency: NHLBI NIH HHS, Id: R24 HL076852
  • Agency: NHLBI NIH HHS, Id: R24 HL076852-01
  • Agency: NHLBI NIH HHS, Id: R24 HL076852-04

Mesh Terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Amygdala
  • Blood Pressure
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Individuality
  • Male
  • Nerve Net
  • Organ Size
  • Pons
  • Stress, Psychological