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CEBS--Chemical Effects in Biological Systems: a public data repository integrating study design and toxicity data with microarray and proteomics data.

Nucleic acids research | Jan 15, 2008

CEBS (Chemical Effects in Biological Systems) is an integrated public repository for toxicogenomics data, including the study design and timeline, clinical chemistry and histopathology findings and microarray and proteomics data. CEBS contains data derived from studies of chemicals and of genetic alterations, and is compatible with clinical and environmental studies. CEBS is designed to permit the user to query the data using the study conditions, the subject responses and then, having identified an appropriate set of subjects, to move to the microarray module of CEBS to carry out gene signature and pathway analysis. Scope of CEBS: CEBS currently holds 22 studies of rats, four studies of mice and one study of Caenorhabditis elegans. CEBS can also accommodate data from studies of human subjects. Toxicogenomics studies currently in CEBS comprise over 4000 microarray hybridizations, and 75 2D gel images annotated with protein identification performed by MALDI and MS/MS. CEBS contains raw microarray data collected in accordance with MIAME guidelines and provides tools for data selection, pre-processing and analysis resulting in annotated lists of genes of interest. Additionally, clinical chemistry and histopathology findings from over 1500 animals are included in CEBS. CEBS/BID: The BID (Biomedical Investigation Database) is another component of the CEBS system. BID is a relational database used to load and curate study data prior to export to CEBS, in addition to capturing and displaying novel data types such as PCR data, or additional fields of interest, including those defined by the HESI Toxicogenomics Committee (in preparation). BID has been shared with Health Canada and the US Environmental Protection Agency. CEBS is available at http://cebs.niehs.nih.gov. BID can be accessed via the user interface from https://dir-apps.niehs.nih.gov/arc/. Requests for a copy of BID and for depositing data into CEBS or BID are available at http://www.niehs.nih.gov/cebs-df/.

Pubmed ID: 17962311 RIS Download

Mesh terms: Animals | Databases, Genetic | Humans | Internet | Mice | Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis | Proteomics | Rats | Systems Integration | Toxicogenetics | User-Computer Interface

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This is a list of tools and resources that we have found mentioned in this publication.


GO

A community-based bioinformatics resource consisting of three structured controlled vocabularies (ontologies) for the annotation of gene products with respect to their molecular function, cellular component, and biological role in a species-independent manner. This initiative to standardize the representation of gene and gene product attributes across species and databases is an effort to address the need for consistent descriptions of gene products in different databases. The Gene Ontology project encourages input from the community into both the content of the GO and annotation using GO. There are three separate aspects to this effort: first, they write and maintain the ontologies themselves; second, they make cross-links between the ontologies and the genes and gene products in the collaborating databases; and third, they develop tools that facilitate the creation, maintenance and use of ontologies. The controlled vocabularies are structured so that users can query them at different levels: for example, uers can use GO to find all the gene products in the mouse genome that are involved in signal transduction, or users can zoom in on all the receptor tyrosine kinases. This structure also allows annotators to assign properties to gene products at different levels, depending on how much is known about a gene product.

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UCSC Genome Browser

A collection of genomes which include reference sequences and working draft assemblies, as well as a variety of tools to explore these sequences. The Genome Browser zooms and scrolls over chromosomes, showing the work of annotators worldwide. The Gene Sorter shows expression, homology and other information on groups of genes that can be related in many ways. Blat quickly maps your sequence to the genome. The Table Browser provides access to the underlying database. VisiGene lets you browse through a large collection of in situ mouse and frog images to examine expression patterns. Genome Graphs allows you to upload and display genome-wide data sets. Also provided is a portal to the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) and Neandertal projects.

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BioCarta Pathways

BioCarta Pathways allows users to observe how genes interact in dynamic graphical models. Online maps available within this resource depict molecular relationships from areas of active research. In an open source approach, this community-fed forum constantly integrates emerging proteomic information from the scientific community. It also catalogs and summarizes important resources providing information for over 120,000 genes from multiple species. Find both classical pathways as well as current suggestions for new pathways.

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