Searching across hundreds of databases

Our searching services are busy right now. Your search will reload in five seconds.

X
Forgot Password

If you have forgotten your password you can enter your email here and get a temporary password sent to your email.

The mouse genome database (MGD): new features facilitating a model system.

Nucleic acids research | Jan 4, 2007

The mouse genome database (MGD, http://www.informatics.jax.org/), the international community database for mouse, provides access to extensive integrated data on the genetics, genomics and biology of the laboratory mouse. The mouse is an excellent and unique animal surrogate for studying normal development and disease processes in humans. Thus, MGD's primary goals are to facilitate the use of mouse models for studying human disease and enable the development of translational research hypotheses based on comparative genotype, phenotype and functional analyses. Core MGD data content includes gene characterization and functions, phenotype and disease model descriptions, DNA and protein sequence data, polymorphisms, gene mapping data and genome coordinates, and comparative gene data focused on mammals. Data are integrated from diverse sources, ranging from major resource centers to individual investigator laboratories and the scientific literature, using a combination of automated processes and expert human curation. MGD collaborates with the bioinformatics community on the development of data and semantic standards, and it incorporates key ontologies into the MGD annotation system, including the Gene Ontology (GO), the Mammalian Phenotype Ontology, and the Anatomical Dictionary for Mouse Development and the Adult Anatomy. MGD is the authoritative source for mouse nomenclature for genes, alleles, and mouse strains, and for GO annotations to mouse genes. MGD provides a unique platform for data mining and hypothesis generation where one can express complex queries simultaneously addressing phenotypic effects, biochemical function and process, sub-cellular location, expression, sequence, polymorphism and mapping data. Both web-based querying and computational access to data are provided. Recent improvements in MGD described here include the incorporation of single nucleotide polymorphism data and search tools, the addition of PIR gene superfamily classifications, phenotype data for NIH-acquired knockout mice, images for mouse phenotypic genotypes, new functional graph displays of GO annotations, and new orthology displays including sequence information and graphic displays.

Pubmed ID: 17135206 RIS Download

Mesh terms: Animals | Computer Graphics | Databases, Genetic | Disease Models, Animal | Genomics | Genotype | Internet | Mice | Mice, Knockout | Models, Animal | Phenotype | Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide | Proteins | Sequence Homology | Systems Integration | User-Computer Interface

Publication data is provided by the National Library of Medicine ® and PubMed ®. Data is retrieved from PubMed ® on a weekly schedule. For terms and conditions see the National Library of Medicine Terms and Conditions.

This is a list of tools and resources that we have found mentioned in this publication.


GO

A community-based bioinformatics resource consisting of three structured controlled vocabularies (ontologies) for the annotation of gene products with respect to their molecular function, cellular component, and biological role in a species-independent manner. This initiative to standardize the representation of gene and gene product attributes across species and databases is an effort to address the need for consistent descriptions of gene products in different databases. The Gene Ontology project encourages input from the community into both the content of the GO and annotation using GO. There are three separate aspects to this effort: first, they write and maintain the ontologies themselves; second, they make cross-links between the ontologies and the genes and gene products in the collaborating databases; and third, they develop tools that facilitate the creation, maintenance and use of ontologies. The controlled vocabularies are structured so that users can query them at different levels: for example, uers can use GO to find all the gene products in the mouse genome that are involved in signal transduction, or users can zoom in on all the receptor tyrosine kinases. This structure also allows annotators to assign properties to gene products at different levels, depending on how much is known about a gene product.

tool

View all literature mentions

Jackson Laboratory

An independent, nonprofit organization focused on mammalian genetics research to advance human health. Their mission is to discover the genetic basis for preventing, treating, and curing human disease, and to enable research for the global biomedical community. Jackson Laboratory breeds and manages colonies of mice as resources for other research institutions and laboratories, along with providing software and techniques. Jackson Lab also conducts genetic research and provides educational material for various educational levels.

tool

View all literature mentions

RGD

Centralized database that collects, manages, and distributes data generated from ongoing rat genetic and genomic research efforts and makes these data widely available to the scientific community. Curation of mapped positions for quantitative trait loci, known mutations and other phenotypic data is provided. It also facilitates investigators research efforts by providing tools to search, mine, and analyze this data. Strain reports include a comprehensive description of strain origin, disease, phenotype, genetics, immunology, behavior with links to related genes, QTLs, sub-strains, and strain sources.

tool

View all literature mentions