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Oxytocin modulates neural circuitry for social cognition and fear in humans.

In non-human mammals, the neuropeptide oxytocin is a key mediator of complex emotional and social behaviors, including attachment, social recognition, and aggression. Oxytocin reduces anxiety and impacts on fear conditioning and extinction. Recently, oxytocin administration in humans was shown to increase trust, suggesting involvement of the amygdala, a central component of the neurocircuitry of fear and social cognition that has been linked to trust and highly expresses oxytocin receptors in many mammals. However, no human data on the effects of this peptide on brain function were available. Here, we show that human amygdala function is strongly modulated by oxytocin. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to image amygdala activation by fear-inducing visual stimuli in 15 healthy males after double-blind crossover intranasal application of placebo or oxytocin. Compared with placebo, oxytocin potently reduced activation of the amygdala and reduced coupling of the amygdala to brainstem regions implicated in autonomic and behavioral manifestations of fear. Our results indicate a neural mechanism for the effects of oxytocin in social cognition in the human brain and provide a methodology and rationale for exploring therapeutic strategies in disorders in which abnormal amygdala function has been implicated, such as social phobia or autism.

Pubmed ID: 16339042


  • Kirsch P
  • Esslinger C
  • Chen Q
  • Mier D
  • Lis S
  • Siddhanti S
  • Gruppe H
  • Mattay VS
  • Gallhofer B
  • Meyer-Lindenberg A


The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience

Publication Data

December 7, 2005

Associated Grants

  • Agency: Intramural NIH HHS, Id:

Mesh Terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Cognition
  • Double-Blind Method
  • Fear
  • Humans
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging
  • Male
  • Nerve Net
  • Oxytocin
  • Photic Stimulation
  • Psychomotor Performance
  • Social Behavior