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The subsystems approach to genome annotation and its use in the project to annotate 1000 genomes.

Nucleic acids research | Oct 10, 2005

The release of the 1000th complete microbial genome will occur in the next two to three years. In anticipation of this milestone, the Fellowship for Interpretation of Genomes (FIG) launched the Project to Annotate 1000 Genomes. The project is built around the principle that the key to improved accuracy in high-throughput annotation technology is to have experts annotate single subsystems over the complete collection of genomes, rather than having an annotation expert attempt to annotate all of the genes in a single genome. Using the subsystems approach, all of the genes implementing the subsystem are analyzed by an expert in that subsystem. An annotation environment was created where populated subsystems are curated and projected to new genomes. A portable notion of a populated subsystem was defined, and tools developed for exchanging and curating these objects. Tools were also developed to resolve conflicts between populated subsystems. The SEED is the first annotation environment that supports this model of annotation. Here, we describe the subsystem approach, and offer the first release of our growing library of populated subsystems. The initial release of data includes 180 177 distinct proteins with 2133 distinct functional roles. This data comes from 173 subsystems and 383 different organisms.

Pubmed ID: 16214803 RIS Download

Mesh terms: Acyl Coenzyme A | Coenzyme A | Computational Biology | Genome, Archaeal | Genome, Bacterial | Genomics | Internet | Leucine | Ribosomal Proteins | Software | Terminology as Topic | Vocabulary, Controlled

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Gene Ontology

Computable knowledge regarding functions of genes and gene products. GO resources include biomedical ontologies that cover molecular domains of all life forms as well as extensive compilations of gene product annotations to these ontologies that provide largely species-neutral, comprehensive statements about what gene products do. Used to standardize representation of gene and gene product attributes across species and databases.

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