• Register
X
Forgot Password

If you have forgotten your password you can enter your email here and get a temporary password sent to your email.

X

Leaving Community

Are you sure you want to leave this community? Leaving the community will revoke any permissions you have been granted in this community.

No
Yes

Structural brain magnetic resonance imaging of limbic and thalamic volumes in pediatric bipolar disorder.

BACKGROUND: Youths with bipolar disorder are ideal for studying illness pathophysiology given their early presentation, lack of extended treatment, and high genetic loading. Adult bipolar disorder MRI studies have focused increasingly on limbic structures and the thalamus because of their role in mood and cognition. On the basis of adult studies, the authors hypothesized a priori that youths with bipolar disorder would have amygdalar, hippocampal, and thalamic volume abnormalities. METHOD: Forty-three youths 6-16 years of age with DSM-IV bipolar disorder (23 male, 20 female) and 20 healthy comparison subjects (12 male, eight female) similar in age and sex underwent structured and clinical interviews, neurological examination, and cognitive testing. Differences in limbic and thalamic brain volumes, on the logarithmic scale, were tested using a two-way (diagnosis and sex) univariate analysis of variance, with total cerebral volume and age controlled. RESULTS: The subjects with bipolar disorder had smaller hippocampal volumes. Further analysis revealed that this effect was driven predominantly by the female bipolar disorder subjects. In addition, both male and female youths with bipolar disorder had significantly smaller cerebral volumes. No significant hemispheric effects were seen. CONCLUSIONS: These findings support the hypothesis that the limbic system, in particular the hippocampus, may be involved in the pathophysiology of pediatric bipolar disorder. While this report may represent the largest MRI study of pediatric bipolar disorder to date, more work is needed to confirm these findings and to determine if they are unique to pediatric bipolar disorder.

Pubmed ID: 15994707

Authors

  • Frazier JA
  • Chiu S
  • Breeze JL
  • Makris N
  • Lange N
  • Kennedy DN
  • Herbert MR
  • Bent EK
  • Koneru VK
  • Dieterich ME
  • Hodge SM
  • Rauch SL
  • Grant PE
  • Cohen BM
  • Seidman LJ
  • Caviness VS
  • Biederman J

Journal

The American journal of psychiatry

Publication Data

July 4, 2005

Associated Grants

  • Agency: NIMH NIH HHS, Id: K08 MH 01573-01
  • Agency: NIMH NIH HHS, Id: K08 MH001573
  • Agency: NINDS NIH HHS, Id: NS 37483

Mesh Terms

  • Adolescent
  • Age Factors
  • Ambulatory Care
  • Atrophy
  • Bipolar Disorder
  • Brain Mapping
  • Child
  • Female
  • Hippocampus
  • Humans
  • Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
  • Limbic System
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging
  • Male
  • Organ Size
  • Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
  • Sex Factors
  • Telencephalon
  • Thalamus