Preparing your results

Our searching services are busy right now. Your search will reload in five seconds.

X
Forgot Password

If you have forgotten your password you can enter your email here and get a temporary password sent to your email.

Recql5 and Blm RecQ DNA helicases have nonredundant roles in suppressing crossovers.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15831450

In eukaryotes, crossovers in mitotic cells can have deleterious consequences and therefore must be suppressed. Mutations in BLM give rise to Bloom syndrome, a disease that is characterized by an elevated rate of crossovers and increased cancer susceptibility. However, simple eukaryotes such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae have multiple pathways for suppressing crossovers, suggesting that mammals also have multiple pathways for controlling crossovers in their mitotic cells. We show here that in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells, mutations in either the Bloom syndrome homologue (Blm) or the Recql5 genes result in a significant increase in the frequency of sister chromatid exchange (SCE), whereas deleting both Blm and Recql5 lead to an even higher frequency of SCE. These data indicate that Blm and Recql5 have nonredundant roles in suppressing crossovers in mouse ES cells. Furthermore, we show that mouse embryonic fibroblasts derived from Recql5 knockout mice also exhibit a significantly increased frequency of SCE compared with the corresponding wild-type control. Thus, this study identifies a previously unknown Recql5-dependent, Blm-independent pathway for suppressing crossovers during mitosis in mice.

Pubmed ID: 15831450 RIS Download

Mesh terms: Adenosine Triphosphatases | Animals | Bloom Syndrome | Crossing Over, Genetic | DNA Helicases | Fibroblasts | Gamma Rays | Gene Deletion | Gene Silencing | Gene Targeting | Mice | Mice, Knockout | Mitosis | RecQ Helicases | Sister Chromatid Exchange | Stem Cells

Research resources used in this publication

None found

Research tools detected in this publication

None found

Data used in this publication

None found

Associated grants

None

Publication data is provided by the National Library of Medicine ® and PubMed ®. Data is retrieved from PubMed ® on a weekly schedule. For terms and conditions see the National Library of Medicine Terms and Conditions.