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Lethal, neonatal ichthyosis with increased proteolytic processing of filaggrin in a mouse model of Netherton syndrome.

Human molecular genetics | Jan 15, 2005

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15590704

Netherton syndrome is an autosomal recessive multisystemic disorder characterized by congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma, hair shaft defects and atopy, caused by mutations within the human SPINK5 gene. To investigate the development of this disease, we have cloned mouse spink5 and created mice with a mutated premature stop codon at amino acid R820X, to produce an allele that closely mimics a point mutation (E827X) in human SPINK5. Newborn spink5(R820X/R820X) mice develop a lethal, severe ichthyosis with a loss of skin barrier function and dehydration, resulting in death within a few hours of birth, similar to that observed in patients with severe Netherton syndrome. Epidermal barrier function is compromised because of the stratum corneum becoming spontaneously detached in the newborn mice, and this is probably compounded by the reduced mechanical strength detected in the cornified envelopes. Biochemical analysis of skin from newborn wild-type and spink5(R820X/R820X) mice revealed a substantial increase in the proteolytic processing of profilaggrin into its constituent filaggrin monomers. Filaggrin functions to organize keratin filaments into highly ordered macrofibrils that crisscross the cornified cells of the stratum corneum imparting structural integrity, and defects in filaggrin processing occur in a number of forms of congenital ichthyosis. These data suggest that in the absence of the serine protease inhibitor spink5, there is an abnormal increase in the processing of profilaggrin, resulting in an overabundance of filaggrin monomers, and that this may play a direct role in the observed deficit in the adhesion of the stratum corneum and the severely compromised epidermal barrier function.

Pubmed ID: 15590704 RIS Download

Mesh terms: Amino Acid Sequence | Animals | Genes, Lethal | Humans | Ichthyosis | Intermediate Filament Proteins | Mice | Molecular Sequence Data | Protein Processing, Post-Translational | Serpins

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