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LARGE can functionally bypass alpha-dystroglycan glycosylation defects in distinct congenital muscular dystrophies.

Nature medicine | Jul 1, 2004

Several congenital muscular dystrophies caused by defects in known or putative glycosyltransferases are commonly associated with hypoglycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (alpha-DG) and a marked reduction of its receptor function. We have investigated changes in the processing and function of alpha-DG resulting from genetic manipulation of LARGE, the putative glycosyltransferase mutated both in Large(myd) mice and in humans with congenital muscular dystrophy 1D (MDC1D). Here we show that overexpression of LARGE ameliorates the dystrophic phenotype of Large(myd) mice and induces the synthesis of glycan-enriched alpha-DG with high affinity for extracellular ligands. Notably, LARGE circumvents the alpha-DG glycosylation defect in cells from individuals with genetically distinct types of congenital muscular dystrophy. Gene transfer of LARGE into the cells of individuals with congenital muscular dystrophies restores alpha-DG receptor function, whereby glycan-enriched alpha-DG coordinates the organization of laminin on the cell surface. Our findings indicate that modulation of LARGE expression or activity is a viable therapeutic strategy for glycosyltransferase-deficient congenital muscular dystrophies.

Pubmed ID: 15184894 RIS Download

Mesh terms: Animals | Cytoskeletal Proteins | Dystroglycans | Genetic Therapy | Glycosylation | Glycosyltransferases | Humans | Laminin | Membrane Glycoproteins | Mice | Muscular Dystrophies | N-Acetylglucosaminyltransferases | Neoplasm Proteins

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