Searching across hundreds of databases

Our searching services are busy right now. Your search will reload in five seconds.

X
Forgot Password

If you have forgotten your password you can enter your email here and get a temporary password sent to your email.

X
Forgot Password

If you have forgotten your password you can enter your email here and get a temporary password sent to your email.

Cystic fibrosis in the mouse by targeted insertional mutagenesis.

Nature | Sep 17, 1992

Cystic fibrosis is a fatal genetic disorder which afflicts 50,000 people worldwide. A viable animal model would be invaluable for investigating and combating this disease. The mouse cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene was disrupted in embryonal stem cells using an insertional gene targeting vector. Germ-line chimaeras were derived and the offspring of heterozygous crosses studied. These homozygous mutant mice survive beyond weaning. In vivo electrophysiology demonstrates the predicted defect in chloride ion transport in these mice and can distinguish between each genotype. Histological analysis detects important hallmarks of human disease pathology, including abnormalities of the colon, lung and vas deferens. This insertional mouse mutation provides a valid model system for the development and testing of therapies for cystic fibrosis patients.

Pubmed ID: 1382232 RIS Download

Mesh terms: Animals | Biological Transport | Chimera | Chlorine | Chromosome Mapping | Cystic Fibrosis | Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator | Disease Models, Animal | Female | Genes, Regulator | Genotype | Male | Membrane Potentials | Membrane Proteins | Mice | Mice, Inbred Strains | Mutagenesis, Insertional

Research resources used in this publication

None found

Research tools detected in this publication

None found

Data used in this publication

None found

Associated grants

None

Publication data is provided by the National Library of Medicine ® and PubMed ®. Data is retrieved from PubMed ® on a weekly schedule. For terms and conditions see the National Library of Medicine Terms and Conditions.

We have not found any resources mentioned in this publication.