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Smaller hippocampal volume predicts pathologic vulnerability to psychological trauma.

Nature neuroscience | Nov 29, 2002

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12379862

In animals, exposure to severe stress can damage the hippocampus. Recent human studies show smaller hippocampal volume in individuals with the stress-related psychiatric condition posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Does this represent the neurotoxic effect of trauma, or is smaller hippocampal volume a pre-existing condition that renders the brain more vulnerable to the development of pathological stress responses? In monozygotic twins discordant for trauma exposure, we found evidence that smaller hippocampi indeed constitute a risk factor for the development of stress-related psychopathology. Disorder severity in PTSD patients who were exposed to trauma was negatively correlated with the hippocampal volume of both the patients and the patients' trauma-unexposed identical co-twin. Furthermore, severe PTSD twin pairs-both the trauma-exposed and unexposed members-had significantly smaller hippocampi than non-PTSD pairs.

Pubmed ID: 12379862 RIS Download

Mesh terms: Alcoholism | Combat Disorders | Comorbidity | Hippocampus | Humans | Male | Middle Aged | Risk Factors | Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic | Substance-Related Disorders | Twins, Monozygotic

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