• Register
X
Forgot Password

If you have forgotten your password you can enter your email here and get a temporary password sent to your email.

X

Leaving Community

Are you sure you want to leave this community? Leaving the community will revoke any permissions you have been granted in this community.

No
Yes

Brain activity during simulated deception: an event-related functional magnetic resonance study.

TheGuilty Knowledge Test (GKT) has been used extensively to model deception. An association between the brain evoked response potentials and lying on the GKT suggests that deception may be associated with changes in other measures of brain activity such as regional blood flow that could be anatomically localized with event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Blood oxygenation level-dependent fMRI contrasts between deceptive and truthful responses were measured with a 4 Tesla scanner in 18 participants performing the GKT and analyzed using statistical parametric mapping. Increased activity in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), the superior frontal gyrus (SFG), and the left premotor, motor, and anterior parietal cortex was specifically associated with deceptive responses. The results indicate that: (a) cognitive differences between deception and truth have neural correlates detectable by fMRI, (b) inhibition of the truthful response may be a basic component of intentional deception, and (c) ACC and SFG are components of the basic neural circuitry for deception.

Pubmed ID: 11848716

Authors

  • Langleben DD
  • Schroeder L
  • Maldjian JA
  • Gur RC
  • McDonald S
  • Ragland JD
  • O'Brien CP
  • Childress AR

Journal

NeuroImage

Publication Data

March 18, 2002

Associated Grants

None

Mesh Terms

  • Adult
  • Cerebral Cortex
  • Deception
  • Dominance, Cerebral
  • Female
  • Guilt
  • Gyrus Cinguli
  • Humans
  • Lie Detection
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Nerve Net
  • Truth Disclosure