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The sorbin homology domain: a motif for the targeting of proteins to lipid rafts.

On phosphorylation of Cbl, the c-Cbl-associated protein (CAP)/Cbl complex dissociates from the insulin receptor and translocates to a lipid raft membrane fraction to form a ternary complex with flotillin. Deletion analyses of the CAP gene identified a 115-aa region responsible for flotillin binding. This region is homologous to the peptide sorbin and is referred to as the sorbin homology (SoHo) domain. This domain is present in two other proteins, vinexin and ArgBP2. Vinexin also interacted with flotillin, and deletion of its SoHo domain similarly blocked flotillin binding. The overexpression of a CAP mutant in which the SoHo domain had been deleted (CAPDeltaSoHo) prevented the translocation of Cbl to lipid rafts and subsequently blocked the recruitment of CrkII and C3G. Moreover, overexpression of CAPDeltaSoHo prevented the stimulation of glucose transport and GLUT4 translocation by insulin. These results suggest a mechanism for localization of signaling proteins to the lipid raft that mediates the compartmentalization of crucial signal transduction pathways.

Pubmed ID: 11481476


  • Kimura A
  • Baumann CA
  • Chiang SH
  • Saltiel AR


Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

Publication Data

July 31, 2001

Associated Grants


Mesh Terms

  • 3T3 Cells
  • Amino Acid Motifs
  • Amino Acid Sequence
  • Animals
  • Base Sequence
  • Cell Line
  • DNA Primers
  • Glucose
  • Humans
  • Insulin
  • Lipid Metabolism
  • Mice
  • Molecular Sequence Data
  • Peptides
  • Phosphorylation
  • Protein Transport
  • Proto-Oncogene Proteins
  • Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-cbl
  • Sequence Homology, Amino Acid
  • Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases