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Regulation of endocytosis by CUP-5, the Caenorhabditis elegans mucolipin-1 homolog.

Loss of the human mucolipin-1 gene underlies mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV), a lysosomal storage disease that results in severe developmental neuropathology. Unlike other lysosomal storage diseases, MLIV is not associated with a lack of lysosomal hydrolases; instead, MLIV cells display abnormal endocytosis of lipids and accumulate large vesicles, indicating that a defect in endocytosis may underlie the disease. Here we report the identification of a loss-of-function mutation in the Caenorhabditis elegans mucolipin-1 homolog, cup-5, and show that this mutation results in an enhanced rate of uptake of fluid-phase markers, decreased degradation of endocytosed protein and accumulation of large vacuoles. Overexpression of cup-5(+) causes the opposite phenotype, indicating that cup-5 activity controls aspects of endocytosis. Studies in model organisms such as C. elegans have helped illuminate fundamental mechanisms involved in normal cellular function and human disease; thus the C. elegans cup-5 mutant may be a useful model for studying conserved aspects of mucolipin-1 structure and function and for assessing the effects of potential therapeutic compounds.

Pubmed ID: 11326278

Authors

  • Fares H
  • Greenwald I

Journal

Nature genetics

Publication Data

May 30, 2001

Associated Grants

None

Mesh Terms

  • Amino Acid Sequence
  • Animals
  • Biological Transport
  • Caenorhabditis elegans
  • Caenorhabditis elegans Proteins
  • Endocytosis
  • Helminth Proteins
  • Humans
  • Membrane Proteins
  • Molecular Sequence Data
  • Mucolipidoses
  • Mutation
  • Sequence Homology, Amino Acid
  • TRPM Cation Channels
  • Transient Receptor Potential Channels