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Identification of a gene, ABCG5, important in the regulation of dietary cholesterol absorption.

Nature genetics | Feb 1, 2001

The molecular mechanisms regulating the amount of dietary cholesterol retained in the body, as well as the body's ability to exclude selectively other dietary sterols, are poorly understood. An average western diet will contain about 250-500 mg of dietary cholesterol and about 200-400 mg of non-cholesterol sterols. About 50-60% of the dietary cholesterol is absorbed and retained by the normal human body, but less than 1% of the non-cholesterol sterols are retained. Thus, there exists a subtle mechanism that allows the body to distinguish between cholesterol and non-cholesterol sterols. In sitosterolemia, a rare autosomal recessive disorder, affected individuals hyperabsorb not only cholesterol but also all other sterols, including plant and shellfish sterols from the intestine. The major plant sterol species is sitosterol; hence the name of the disorder. Consequently, patients with this disease have very high levels of plant sterols in the plasma and develop tendon and tuberous xanthomas, accelerated atherosclerosis, and premature coronary artery disease. We previously mapped the STSL locus to human chromosome 2p21 and further localized it to a region of less than 2 cM bounded by markers D2S2294 and D2S2291 (M.-H.L. et al., manuscript submitted). We now report that a new member of the ABC transporter family, ABCG5, is mutant in nine unrelated sitosterolemia patients.

Pubmed ID: 11138003 RIS Download

Mesh terms: ATP Binding Cassette Transporter, Sub-Family G, Member 5 | ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters | Absorption | Amino Acid Sequence | Animals | Base Sequence | Cholesterol, Dietary | Cloning, Molecular | DNA Mutational Analysis | Europe | Exons | Female | Humans | Japan | Lipid Metabolism, Inborn Errors | Lipoproteins | Male | Mice | Molecular Sequence Data | Mutation | North America | Pedigree | Phylogeny | RNA, Messenger | Rats | Sequence Alignment | Sitosterols

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Associated grants

  • Agency: NCRR NIH HHS, Id: M01 RR000633
  • Agency: NHLBI NIH HHS, Id: R01 HL060613

Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (Data, Disease Annotation)

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